Play to pave the way for pooing in the potty!

It's not uncommon for little ones to have a fear of pooing in the potty (or toilet). And often it leaves parents feeling really unsure of what to do; not wanting to pressure their child for fear of making things worse, but also not really knowing how to encourage their child without resorting to rewards … Continue reading Play to pave the way for pooing in the potty!

Pillow games for responding playfully to our child’s aggression

I love pillows as props for responding playfully when my child feels like hitting or kicking! When kids are hitting or kicking, they are usually in a defensive state of fight-or-flight, which means they have lots of adrenaline pumping through their body, giving their muscles a surge of energy. Pillows offer the possibility of so … Continue reading Pillow games for responding playfully to our child’s aggression

Kids’ aggression, responding playfully, and the challenge for parents

Putting together my own observations and experiences, and what I know about the nervous system, I’d like to outline my understanding of what is going on when children lash out, how responding playfully can help, and why it can be so challenging for parents. WHY DO KIDS LASH OUT?  When kids are lashing out, their nervous … Continue reading Kids’ aggression, responding playfully, and the challenge for parents

Setting limits playfully – The “chase and can’t catch” game

So last night my boy was bouncing a bit too vigorously on the sofa to the point that I thought he might damage the structure of the sofa. 🌼 From close by in the kitchen, I said to him in a silly voice, “I feel you are jumping too vigorously on the sofa!” (playful connection). 🌼 I … Continue reading Setting limits playfully – The “chase and can’t catch” game

“I’m fat”, “I’m dumb” : Responding to kids’ negative self-talk

I recently saw a post from a mum sharing about how her young daughter had started to express discomfort with her weight, and to call herself fat. And then another post by a mum about how her son was having trouble learning, and had called himself dumb. In both of these situations, I really connected … Continue reading “I’m fat”, “I’m dumb” : Responding to kids’ negative self-talk